Mental Health – The Invisible Problem

It’s easy to know how to deal with someone who breaks their leg and has to take time off work because they are unable to travel in or need to go to physio appointments – but dealing with mental health in the workplace is harder because it is invisible.

Mental health and stress is the main cause of absence at work

And yet it is something that anyone working in HR must address.  In 2015, for the first time, the CIPD Absence Management Survey cited mental heath and stress as the main cause of absence in the workplace and now states that reported health problems at work has risen from a quarter to almost third in the past five years (and to 46% in the voluntary sector).

One in four suffer from a mental health condition

With one in four people in the UK suffering from some kind of mental health condition, this is not something that can be swept under the carpet. If you knew of a condition that could potentially affect a quarter of your staff, surely you would be encouraging staff to share experiences, maybe even form some sort of support network…

Mental health problems in the UK adds up to £26 billion a year

And yet the sad fact is that many people who are open about their mental health issues find that they become sidelined at work – albeit discreetly. Not only is this very unfortunate for the staff involved, it can also open up a new can of problems for the employer. Staff affected by a mental health issue are not going to perform to their best ability, and one employment lawyer told us that he is seeing more and more claims from employees who are feeling under pressure to walk out of their jobs and are making claims for constructive dismissal. And the Centre for Mental Health estimated that the total cost of mental health problems for UK employers adds up to £26 billion a year.

But it is not just about absenteeism. According to the CIPD research, around half of people experiencing mental health problem still go into work – which can result in them finding it hard to concentrate, having difficulty making decisions, and taking longer to carry out tasks.

Steps you can take as the employer

So what can you do to help? An open culture that makes employees feels comfortable about revealing their mental health issues, without fear of redress, is vital. In the Employee Outlook report from the CIPD (July 2016) only two in five respondents said they would feel comfortable disclosing mental health issues with their manager or employer. But they also need to know that being honest about their problems will be met with understanding and support. Helpful, and yet quite small changes, such as adjusting working hours or workload can make a big difference.

Of course, understanding the range of mental health problems is also an important part of the procedure. Depression and stress may immediately come to mind but there are other issues, such as panic attacks and OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder). Colin Minto, founding partner of Big Idea Talent, a network of HR and resourcing associates, suffers from OCD. It’s not all about obsessive cleaning, as some would have you believe, but the obsessive compulsion can attach itself to all kinds of scenarios. Yet, Colin says on the CIPD website, it is not always a disadvantage: “I see benefits to my OCD. I can see on a page of writing, a half point-size difference between two letters. I can analyse things and spot a risk a mile off. I’ve been told I think differently at work – I bring a different perspective to other people. In some ways, OCD helps me do my job better.”

He would love employers to see how people’s ‘differences’ could actually help improve their business.

“I want businesses to realise it doesn’t need to affect productivity and performance – on the contrary, if you support people, it could actually increase them. People who are different come up with different, sometimes better, solutions, and form better teams.”

Embrace HR Limited, based in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, helps SMEs who do not have their own HR departments, or those who need HR support from time to time. Please get in touch if you have any questions or require more information on this article by email: cecily.lalloo@embracehr.co.uk or phone: 07767 308 717.

Workplace Stress and How to Avoid it

In the last of our series on wellbeing, we are looking at stress, how HR can help managers and staff to avoid it, and what effect it can have on companies.

The number of working days lost to work-related stress, depression or anxiety in 2014/15 was 9.9 million, according to a Labour Force Survey.

That means that the condition affected 1,380 workers in every 100,000, with each person losing 23 days a year – that’s nearly a month of working days! Public services such as health, education, and public administration are particularly hard hit by these conditions. It is also more prevalent in larger organisations.

So what is causing this phenomenon?

According to the survey, the predominant cause was workload, including tight deadlines, too much work, pressure and responsibility.

Other factors included a lack of managerial support, organisational changes at work, lack of control, violence and role uncertainty, ie, the lack of clarity about the job and uncertainty over what an individual is meant to do.

What’s more, a study by the British Heart Foundation found that those affected by workplace stress also put their health at risk by smoking more, drinking more, eating the wrong foods and failing to exercise.

Most of the issues can be tackled within the workplace.

What you can do

When it comes to workload, deadlines and pressure, ensuring that staff are taking the holidays they are entitled to, and that staff absences are not putting pressure on those workers who are left to cover is vital. Proper holiday planning, detailed handovers, and monitoring of the number of days taken off are all vital. Monitoring may highlight patterns for instance of sickness absence, that a manager can then address.

It also means that if staff leave, or are absent for some time, proper cover should be provided, rather than relying on other members of staff to cover their own work as well as that of a missing colleague.

You also need to make sure that hours are in line with the Working Time Regulations – working no more than 48 hours a week on average – normally averaged over 17 weeks.  And those under 18 cannot work for more than eight hours a day or 40 hours a week. There are exceptions of course, in professions such as the armed forces, police and emergency services, security and surveillance.  Staff may opt out of the Working Time Regulations and you can find details on this at the Gov.uk website here.

The Working Time Regulations govern the hours most workers can work and set:

  •  limits on an average working week
  • statutory entitlement to paid leave for most workers
  • limits on the normal hours of night work and regular health assessments
  • special regulations for young workers.

As with so many things, prevention is most definitely better than cure. The company needs to have procedures in place so that issues are reported with confidence, and regular reviews between managers and staff can ensure that any problems are picked up early, so that measures can be put in place to prevent situations worsening.

You can also encourage managers to lead by example and by creating a far more pleasant workplace culture. They should encourage regular breaks, not expect long working hours, encourage lunch to be taken away from a desk, and also be open to flexible working, if it is viable in your industry.

There is a lot to take in here. You might like to refer back to our two previous blogs in the wellbeing series.

  •  Holidays are vital to a healthy workplace – click here
  • Fit and healthy staff make for a fit and healthy company – click here

But the overriding message is simple, look after your staff and it will pay dividends!

If you have issues with planning and managing holidays and absenteeism, do talk to us about HR software solutions. We recommend Staff Squared.

Equally, we are well placed to assist you in implementing a plan to address managing wellbeing in the workplace, including drawing up clear and relevant job descriptions, objectives setting and appraisals; all of which can help identify learning and development needs giving your teams more confidence to do the job effectively and efficiently.

We look forward to hearing from you. Email us or phone Cecily on 07767 308 717.

Embrace HR Limited, based in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, helps SMEs who do not have their own HR departments, or those who need HR support from time to time.

Fit and healthy staff make for a fit and healthy company

This is part two of our wellbeing series. You can read our previous blog on how vital holidays are for a healthy workplace here.

As we head into summer, health and fitness come to the fore. We all start to feel more energised once the sun shines, and are more inclined to eat healthily, get out in the fresh air and do a bit more physical activity.

In the second part of a three-part series on wellbeing, this month we look at how employee health, wellbeing and engagement lead to organisational success.

“There is substantial evidence showing that employee health, well-being and engagement are important for organisational success” CIPD, the professional body for HR and people development

The Research Insight from which the above is taken states: There is substantial evidence showing that employee health, well-being and engagement are important for organisational success. If employees are in poor health and/or disengaged, there are potentially significant risks for their employer, such as: costs associated with sickness absence, presenteeism (employees present at work, but not performing because of health problems) and employee turnover, and the legal or reputational risks associated with employees taking a case to an employment tribunal or other litigation. Conversely, where an employer looks after the health and well-being of the workforce and engages employees, they can expect positive gains, including improved performance and productivity.

Holidays

We may be off work, but how many of us are, in effect, just away from our desks? The rise of smartphones and other portable devices means that even if we’re on the other side of the world, we are likely to see work-related emails and posts – and of course more likely to engage, even while we sit by the pool!

In a Harris poll of 2000 UK employees conducted for jobs review site Glassdoor last year, 51 per cent admitted to doing some work while on holiday. Of those employees who worked on holiday, 11 per cent said they were worried about getting behind with their workload; 10 per cent said were hoping for a pay rise; and even more worryingly – 6 per cent feared they would lose their job.

Creating a culture where employees either can’t or won’t switch off does nobody any favours. In the UK, workers are entitled to 5.6 weeks (28 days) paid holiday a year – a guideline intended to ensure their health and wellbeing. Workers who are always ‘on the job’ are more likely to fall prey to stress-related illness.

Employers can also risk falling foul of employment regulations, as staff who are ‘on call’ like this are not properly on holiday, and guidelines on working hours and holiday entitlements could be breached.

Productivity

According to research by Towers Watson (Fairhurst and O’Connor 2010), the happiest and most productive employees are those that enjoy both high levels of wellbeing and high levels of engagement. An employee who has a high level of engagement but whose wellbeing is not taken care of may be very productive, but is more likely to leave an organisation or simply burnout.

Those with high levels of wellbeing, but a lack of engagement, are likely to stay with the organisation for a long time, but are less likely to be committed to the company’s goals.

You may like to download and read a copy of their related strategy article: Employee Well-Being: Taking Engagement and Performance to the Next Level.

So, to keep your staff at their most productive, you need to take care of both their wellbeing and their engagement levels – and ensuring that they take ‘proper’ holidays is one way you can do this.

Three ways you can help staff take a proper break:

  • Ensure an appropriate handover to the staff who remain occurs before they go away.
  • Insist that texts or emails are only sent for very urgent matters.
  • Set up phones and emails with an out-of-office message and divert emails and calls to another member of staff for the duration of the holiday.

If you need clarity regarding holiday entitlement for your staff, or on any of the other points above, please do get in touch. Email us or phone Cecily on 07767 308 717.

Embrace HR Limited, based in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, helps SMEs who do not have their own HR departments, or those who need HR support from time to time.

Holidays are vital for a healthy workplace

A healthy workplace is vital, and HR has a major role to play in creating the best conditions for staff.

Staff ill health can cost the UK around £14 billion a year according to the CBI’s 2013 Sickness Absence survey, and the CIPD 2015 Absence Management survey reckoned the average annual median cost of absence per employee was £554.

And these figures may not take into account indirect costs, such as a drop in employee morale, loss of productivity and reduced customer service; things that can have a very real effect on any business.

Ensuring that your people take all the holiday they are entitled to is just one way in which to ensure employees keep healthy and happy.

Under the Working Time Regulations 1998, workers (including part-timers and most agency staff) have the right to 5.6 weeks’ paid leave each year.

However, according to research commissioned by Elance-Odesk, an online marketplace which connects businesses and freelancers, British workers are subject to an extra 6.5 extra working hours each week because companies don’t prepare properly for the holiday season.

So how can you prepare for holidays?

By this time of year, you should have a reasonable picture of when staff will be taking their long summer vacations, and have checked for any potential clashes.

If you don’t, do make sure that everyone is aware of the holiday request procedures and how much leave they have remaining.

  • Once you have holidays in place, ensure that your teams are aware of what recurring tasks need to be carried out over the period when you have people away, and manage how those tasks will be redistributed and what deadlines are looming.
  • Find out whether extra cover will be needed to ensure your operation continues to run smoothly, and allow time for training temporary staff if necessary.

Depending on the size and nature of your organisation, it may not be able to cope if too many people are away at the same time. If this is the case, the individuals must be informed as early as possible about the situation and how it will be handled.

Likewise, if you need people working over bank holidays, plenty of notice is needed. You could offer incentives such as reduced office hours and time off in lieu.

Before they go on holiday, make sure that your people set up appropriate out-of-office messages for email and phones, and provide a detailed handover document if required.

Encourage staff to take holidays

However challenging it may be to sort out holidays, especially in smaller teams, it is imperative for the morale and wellbeing of your employees.

Not all holidays need to be long ones, though. Encourage staff to take short breaks, which will allow them to return to work relaxed and invigorated, in between any longer vacations they may take.

If staff aren’t taking their holidays, look at the reasons why, and what you can do to help. Is their workload too heavy, are there too many project deadlines, are you short-staffed or do some Managers make it difficult for staff to take their holidays?

Automated holiday management systems

If you have various staff working shifts or part-time hours it can be a challenge to keep track of what time off they accrue.

You could consider a cloud-based personnel software system, such as Staff Squared, which can manage all your employee data and files, and let your staff request holidays using an intuitive calendar. Find out more at Staff2.

For help with your human resources requirements, issues and activities, please contact us for a no obligation discussion. Embrace HR Limited, based in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, helps SMEs who do not have their own HR departments, or those who need HR support from time to time.  Email us or phone Cecily on 07767 308 717.

Six Ways To Spring Clean Your HR Activities

Do you spring clean your house (or better still, get someone else to do it for you!)? This is a great time to spring clean your business too.

The tax year has ended, so many companies will be breathing a sigh of relief – and this is a good time to take a close look at how your organisation operates. Here we focus on getting your Human Resources house in order…

1. Staff reviews

We’re a quarter way through the year now – yes really! So if you recruited new staff at the beginning of the year, they will be more than half-way through a six-month probation period. This is a good time to have a review with them; ascertain exactly how they’re getting on, and where they need more training.  There’s no point waiting until the probationary period is up – get them on the right tracks now. You can also gauge how they are ‘onboarding’, ie, getting used to the social and performance aspects of their job, and learning what skills, attitudes and knowledge will help them to function well within your organisation.

2. Attendance reviews

Poor attendance not only impacts on the record of the person who is not turning up to work, or arriving consistently late, but also has a knock-on effect on others within their team too and of course on the performance of your business. For a start, everyone has to pick up the work not done by the absentee, which can mean some team members become overstretched. If no action is taken against the culprit, it can also lead to resentment and can contribute to a culture where others think they too can exploit the system. Look for and address any issues now, before they become a real problem.

3. Look at time-saving software

How much time do you spend trying to keep track of staff holidays, sick days, meetings and so on? If you have various staff working shifts or part-time hours, it can be hard to keep track of what time off they are owed. Consider cloud-based personnel software, which can manage all your staff data and files, and let your staff request holidays using an intuitive calendar. Contact us or find out more by following this link.

4. Keep in touch

Make sure you keep in touch with staff who are on long-term leave such as maternity leave, bereavement leave or have a long-term health issue. The reasons for this are twofold: not only does it mean that they feel part of the team, and are kept up to date with changes within the company, social events and new job offers, but it also ensures that if they decide they won’t be coming back, you’re likely to hear about it sooner rather than later.

Ensure you have a good policy setting out how you manage KIT (Keep In Touch) days for those on maternity leave or shared parental leave. It should outline how the company will keep in touch with your people while they are away – and what information will be passed on, when days can be taken and what payment arrangements are in place.

5. Objectives and reviews

Taking a look at your objectives should not just be a once-a-year event. Schedule in set times for reviewing company goals and objectives. We know that the pace of change is fast and to keep up with some of your markets or customers you may need to tweak your goals from time to time. Do communicate and discuss the changes with everyone in the organisation as they can help to achieve your objectives if they know what is expected of them. The same is true for teams and individuals – regular one-to-one meetings ensure that you can identify any learning or development issues at an early stage, deal with any problems, and also offer praise, incentives and rewards on a regular basis, and it provides an opportunity for useful two-way feedback.

6. Holidays

It’s important that staff take their minimum statutory holiday entitlement. A good work/life balance ensures your staff get enough down time and family time so that when they are at work they can focus and perform well. Make sure your staff are booking and taking their holidays regularly throughout the year. Does your booking process work well? What system and software will you use? Again a cloud-based system can help with this. Consider our partner HR software system to manage time off – whether it is holiday or not – or get in touch for further information and assistance. If staff aren’t taking their holidays, look at the reasons why, and what you can do to alleviate them. Is their workload too heavy, are there too many project deadlines, are you short-staffed, or do some managers make it difficult for staff to take their holidays?

For help with your human resources requirements, issues and activities, please contact us for a no obligation discussion. Embrace HR Limited, based in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, helps SMEs who do not have their own HR departments, or those who need HR support from time to time.  Email us or phone Cecily on 07767 308 717.

Legislation and Payment Changes April 2016

As always, April sees a number of changes in financial matters and the big change for 2016 is the introduction of the National Living Wage – rates for many other payments, however, have been frozen. Here’s a snapshot of the current situation:

National Living Wage

The headline-grabbing change for this April is the introduction of the compulsory National Living Wage (NLW). From 6 April 2016, this mandatory payment will apply to all workers aged 25 and over.

Initially set at £7.20 an hour, it will run alongside the current National Minimum Wage (NMW) rates (see table – rates are likely to change again on 1 October 2016) and is expected to rise to more than £9 by 2020.

National Minimum Wage

The Government is also targeting employers who fail to pay the correct rates for NMW. An increase in the penalty for underpayment is also on the cards, under the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015. The fine of 100% of the underpayment owed to each worker will be doubled to 200% up to £20,000 per worker.

Statutory Rates

Generally, the rates of Statutory Pay increase in April in line with the Consumer Price Index (CPI), however as this fell by 0.1% in the year to September 2015, the rates for 2016/2017 have been frozen. Employees must earn at least £112 a week to be entitled to these payments – this amount has also been frozen for 2016/17.

Compensation Payments

Laws that will see employer face financial penalties if they fail to pay tribunal awards or Acas settlement sums are expected to come into effect in April 2016. Employers will be forced to pay 50% of the unpaid award – maximum and minimum amounts will apply – and there will be reductions for prompt payment.

For help with your human resources requirements, issues and activities, please contact us for a no obligation discussion. Embrace HR, based in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, helps SMEs who do not have their own HR departments, or those who need HR support from time to time.  Email us at cecily.lalloo@embracehr.co.uk or phone Cecily on 07767 308 717.

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Bank Special Needs Nanny, Wingfield, Leighton Buzzard – CLOSED

A bright, 8-year old boy, is looking for a new Special Needs Nanny to join his bank team. He has Cerebral Palsy with physical and communication difficulties and lives with his Mum and Dad and younger sister. Would you like to help his Mum to attend appointments in term time and to care for him should he be off school unexpectedly? Can you provide cover before and after school and in the early evenings, weekends and school holidays? If so, then continue reading and send your CV to hr.support@embracehr.co.uk or phone 07767 308 717 for more information.

TITLE: Bank Special Needs Nanny

REPORTS TO: Case Manager

ACCOUNTABLE TO: Parents

PLACE OF WORK: Wingfield, Leighton Buzzard nr Dunstable

QUALIFICATIONS/EXPERIENCE: Previous experience of working with children with complex needs, ideally within the home environment and/or the wider community.

WORKING TIME: Bank hours as required, weekdays during term time 7-8.30 a.m. and 4.30-7.30 p.m. Saturdays 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. split shifts : 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.

RATE OF PAY: From £11.00 per hour weekdays

You will be required to undergo an Enhanced DBS check and must have proof of eligibility to work in the UK. A conviction will not necessarily prevent you from this work.

THE JOB ROLE

You will provide the assistance our Client’s parents require for the care of their son and take sole charge at pre-arranged times. You will help with all activities of daily living as well as enable him to access play, learning, social and leisure activities.

Promoting our Client’s wellbeing and support him in implementing the therapy programmes that his therapists and teachers advise will be important as he is making progress in all areas of his development.

ABOUT YOU

You will have previous experience working with children with complex needs, ideally within the home environment and/or the wider community. You are confident working in our Client’s own home and sensitive to the needs and wishes of the family. You will easily establish rapport with children and engage them in activities appropriate to their age and functional abilities. You will be able to deliver care competently and be able to provide evidence to demonstrate this. Your outlook will be positive, you will have a great sense of humour and a fun approach. You will also be patient and tolerant, be a good communicator, reliable and trustworthy with a responsible attitude.

You have a flexible approach and use your own initiative when required. You are willing to update your existing skills and learn new skills. You are fit and able to move and handle, using appropriate techniques and equipment.

You can demonstrate an understanding of confidentiality and privacy and work effectively as part of a team.

It is desirable if you have a qualification in childcare, teaching or nursing but it is not essential.

Car driver and non-smoker essential.

WHAT ARE THE MAIN DUTIES?

Assist with all aspects of his daily activities including his personal care like bathing, washing, dressing, toileting, feeding and medication.

Liaise with his Mum and Dad, the Team Leader and Case Manager regarding his on-going care.

Follow advice and recommendations made by his therapists such as positioning, feeding, exercises, etc.

Engage our Client in stimulating play under the guidance of his parents and therapists.

Facilitate appropriate social and leisure activities.

Maintain daily physiotherapy and postural management programs.

Assist in the care of the Client’s sister, for instance when the parents are spending time with their disabled son.

Assist with general household tasks as and when required.

Maintain accurate records as required.

Maintain your own records of working hours, including completion of timesheets and records of expenses.

Participate in training to the needs of the Client.

Engage in regular supervision with the Case Manager.

Attend meetings and/or case conferences as required.

Provide cover for care team members during holidays and periods of sickness or absence.

Provide support and assistance on family holidays.

Please send your CV and covering letter to hr.support@embracehr.co.uk or phone 07767 308 717 and we will send you an application form.

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Senior Designer for publishing company based in Harrow, Middlesex – CLOSED

REPORTS TO: Head of Design

PAY: circa £23,000 per annum dependent on experience

Can you demonstrate creativity and visual flair?

Do you have a working knowledge of the entire Adobe CS6 Suite or above?

Do you have publishing/magazine design experience?

Apply here and send us your CV and cover letter.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Our client, an independent publisher, is looking for a Designer to join the busy design team. You will be educated to DipHE, BA, or equivalent level in magazine or graphic design.

The company, a leading provider of innovative media solutions to the kitchens, bedrooms and bathrooms and electrical retailing industries, are leaders in the field of publications within these industries. You should be a creative person with magazine design experience. If you have web design skills too that is an advantage but is not essential.

You will work across a portfolio of consumer and B2B titles, including print magazines, but also tablet editions, marketing projects and events.

As a small team, you will be creative and show that you can turn your hand to anything such as:

design layouts and graphic material

commission photography or illustrations

prepare production ready pdfs and pre flight advertisement pages

You will:

be detail conscious, organised and reliable

anticipate potential problems and solutions within the planning process

be aware of the importance of meeting tight deadlines and able to prioritise accordingly

show a sense of urgency on behalf of customers and action requests quickly

provide clear and timely information as required

ensure promises are kept by following through on requests

be flexible in your approach to work

work well as part of a team, promoting effective relationships with individuals and other departments

provide support and guidance to junior team members

You will:

be MAC literate with a complete understanding of all relevant software

have a full working knowledge of Adobe CS6 Suite or above, and it is desirable to have experience with Mag+

produce well designed artwork and graphics to a high professional standard in the correct required format

have knowledge of web design but this is not essential

Your experience will demonstrate:

your knowledge of Abobe’s Creative Suite

a good command of written and spoken English

your work in a publishing/magazine environment (desirable but not essential)

Conditions:

35 hours per week

Pension scheme

Above Statutory Holiday Entitlement after qualifying period

Central Harrow location close to public transport

Friendly working environment

Apply here and send us your CV and cover letter No agencies please.

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Junior Account Manager role in Harrow, Middlesex – CLOSED

If you have a creative flair, have a DipHE, BA, or equivalent in Art and Design and have a good work ethic, apply for this role in a busy design team with a small independent publisher based in Harrow.

The company, a leading provider of innovative media solutions to the kitchens, bedrooms and bathrooms and electrical retailing industries, are leaders in the field of publications in these industries.

They are looking for a very organised and creative person who wants a foothold in media design to work across their portfolio of consumer and B2B titles – including print magazines, but also tablet editions, marketing projects and events.

You will report to the Head of Design and will work closely with the Production Manager.

You will mainly be responsible for:

  • The production elements of the design process
  • Producing print-ready PDFs of their magazine layouts and advertising
  • Laying out advertising pages
  • Producing and designing print and online adverts for clients
  • Liaising directly with clients
  • There will be opportunities to do more advanced design work at the discretion of the Head of Design.

You will:

  • Be very creative, with lots of ideas to share
  • Work well as part of a team, promoting effective relationships with individuals and other departments
  • Anticipate potential problems and solutions
  • Show a sense of urgency on behalf of customers and action requests quickly
  • Ensure that promises are kept by following through on requests
  • Demonstrate a systematic approach to organisation and administration
  • Have a Diploma in Higher Education, a BA, or equivalent in Art and Design

You will have knowledge of:

  • MAC: All relevant design packages including In-Design, Photoshop and Adobe Distiller + Reader
  • PC: Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook and scheduling packages
  • Sound understanding of printing processes
  • Ability to produce PDFs

Conditions:

  • 35 hours per week
  • Pension scheme
  • Above Statutory Holiday Entitlement after qualifying period
  • Central Harrow location close to public transport
  • Friendly working environment

Apply here

Embrace HR is recruiting on behalf of their client and is not a recruitment agency.