Multi Racial Women at Work Embrace HR Aylesbury

When one employee is the ‘golden child’ it can have a negative effect on the rest of your workforce, and it needn’t just apply to individuals. So what is it and what can you do about it?

Positive Bias

You may not have come across the term ‘halo effect’, but you’re bound to have heard the term ‘golden boy/girl’. This may have applied to another pupil when you were at school, or even to one of your siblings.

The halo effect is an unconscious judgment of a person, company or product which subsequently influences their thoughts and feelings about him/her or it. It explains how our overall impression of someone, or something, can colour our perceptions.

For example, at school, there may have been that one child who seemed to be the model student in reception class – never told off, lovely neat handwriting, well ahead on their reading. Or they may have looked like an angelic child who is always chosen for every opportunity – such as sports events or meeting important visitors – throughout their school life. As you got older, perhaps you realised that they weren’t necessarily the best sportsperson, or best public speaker – and started to question why they always got chosen.

It was the halo effect. The teachers, in our example, recognised a child who looked as if they were the ideal student at a young age and never gave them any trouble in the classroom; they perceived everything they did as being at the level of this mythical model student.

If you can remember how that made you and others in the classroom feel – maybe jealous, forgotten, even inferior – you can now take those feelings and transfer them to your adult members of staff.

We know from first-hand experience that this still happens, even in today’s world, and must make every effort, if it doesn’t come naturally, to make a conscientious effort to look past the obvious to find the many positives beneath the façade.

The Halo Effect at Work

The same thing can easily happen in a work situation. An employee makes a good impression when they join the firm – maybe they offer up a clever solution to a problem or get great feedback from a client. They may just be incredibly enthusiastic. Or it could even be something more personal – a hobby they share with a manager, or that they were referred for the job by a senior member of staff.

This creates an impression that remains with them as they work within the organisation. They may not do anything else of outstanding value but if everyone thinks they must be good because the firm’s owner recommended them, or because they appear to be enthused and positive about the work, they are automatically in an advantageous position, when compared with other staff members.

This bias afforded them will, naturally, mean that other staff will not be viewed so positively, even if they are doing a similar job to a similar standard. This can of course lead to resentment, especially if our ‘golden child’ is receiving opportunities and perks that the others aren’t getting.

Interestingly, the opposite is also true. The reverse of the halo effect is referred to as the ‘horns effect’ or the ‘devil’s horns effect’. This is where an initial negative characteristic during a first impression spurs negativity bias, the subsequent impact of any negatives are then greater as a result.

It’s Not Just About People 

The halo effect can also apply to the service you are providing and/or your brand. As they say, you don’t get a second chance to make a first impression and that equally applies in the care sector.

The client’s dealings with your organisation – even before a support worker or carer steps through their door – will also have an impact on their first impression. If they have received great customer service, and clear and transparent communication, they will be more likely to look upon that support worker favourably when they first meet them.

In addition to first impressions, the halo effect can be linked client satisfaction and fulfilment of their complex care needs. Often the quality of care is associated with factors such as cleanliness, maintenance, noise, and food.

What’s the Answer?

With respect to individuals in the workplace, the first thing is to train your senior staff and managers, so that they understand what the halo effect is, and how to recognise if anyone is receiving a positive bias. This often starts at the recruitment stage, with a bias leaning towards interviewees who have a common interest with a manager, or who excel in one particular interview test, which can encourage recruiters to gloss over other less-favourable traits.

This can also happen once the person is employed. If they, for instance, have great results in one area, there might be a tendency to overlook some of their less impressive performances – perhaps how they communicate with other members of staff or clients. HR needs to be aware of this so that they can be proactive when it comes to things such as disciplinary hearings and performance reviews.

In terms of your company and levels of service, do consider the following in respect of your client’s satisfaction:

  1. First Impressions – could your communications be improved? Think look and feel, tone of voice and presentation.
  2. Cleanliness – you’ve heard the expression that cleanliness is next to godliness? Never has a truer word been spoken in connection with care! Cleanliness should be always at the forefront of everyone’s mind.
  3. Maintenance – ensure tools and equipment are maintained, not only in terms of operation but cosmetically too.
  4. Noise – consider how your carers conduct themselves and where they spend time and communicate when on their breaks, including the volume of their voices and any mobile devices.
  5. Food – remember that, in your clients’ eyes, presentation and delivery are just as important as meeting their dietary needs.

Further Reading

You might be interested in this free ebook entitled: The 17 Proven Strategies to Improve Patient Satisfaction & Experience. Although predominantly aimed at hospital care, it may offer some useful insights.

If you would like to discuss this subject further, please contact Cecily Lalloo at Embrace HR Limited.

T: 01296 761288 or contact us here.

If you would like to receive our newsletter, please sign up here.

Based in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, Embrace HR Limited provide a specialised HR service to the care sector, from recruitment through to exit.

Job Support Worker

Support Worker, Northwood, Greater London

A responsible carer is required for a family in Northwood, Greater London to work with their 13-year-old daughter who has special physical needs. It is essential to have a driving licence as you will drive her to and from school on a daily basis in her adapted vehicle. You will work as part of her team.

About the job

  • Take our client to school and collect after school
  • Ensure her safety in her wheelchair on the journey
  • Provide a safe and happy environment
  • Provide a snack for her prior to the journey
  • Provide care and support as required in the home with her family, undertaking tasks as discussed with the Parents, which may include personal care.

Requirements

  • Female required – this is an exemption of the Equal Opportunities Act
  • Must have at least 5 years’s driving experience for car insurance purposes
  • Full UK Drivers licence
  • First aid training
  • Good level of spoken English
  • Awareness of safeguarding and the rights of young people
  • Punctual, committed and dependable
  • A calm temperament, trustworthy, reliable with a good sense of humour, and a passion for working with children
  • Satisfactory references, right to work in the UK, and an Enhanced DBS certificate for child workforce are requirements this Carer / Support Worker role.

If you think this is a job for you but can’t commit to the morning shifts, Consideration will be given to working only the later shift.

Hours: Term Time

  • Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
  • 06:45 to 10:00 and 13:45 to 20:00

School holidays and half terms: Shifts by agreement

Salary: Up to £12.00 per hour.

Part-time hours: 39 per week

COVID-19 considerations:

  • Initial interview will be by telephone. Subsequent interviews may take place by video and face to face.
  • The client’s parents are mindful of the current situation and take every precaution to ensure as COVID-safe an environment as possible.

To find out more and to apply for this position visit: https://uk.indeed.com/job/support-worker-96a6549e10a98144

Closing date for applications: 19 September 2021

Job Support Worker

Support Worker for Nights in West Chiltington, West Sussex

Part-time, permanent, 22 hours per week.

Are you used to disturbed nights?

Do you live in the following catchment areas? Worthing, Brighton, Burgess Hill, Haywards Heath, Lewis, Horsham, Storrington. West Chiltington?

Find out more about this role.

Working time

Sunday and Monday nights from 9:30 p.m. to 8:30 a.m.

Pay rates

  • Sunday night : £115.50 per shift
  • Monday night: £108.50 per shift

About the client

A young boy with cerebral palsy affecting all 4 of his limbs. Mum describes him as “very good natured, sweet, affectionate, non-verbal but does vocalise and uses facial expressions. He is a very happy child.” He is fed and has all medication via a gastronstomy. He loves music, TV, swimming, riding his trike, attempts adventurous activities when on holiday. He enjoys school, being with his friends and is sociable.

About the role

Your role is to help prepare him for sleep and to settle him when he disturbs during the night. You will also assist in his morning routine and get him ready for school during the term. He has physical needs and requires hoisting for all transfers. No night is the same and this role is not a sleeping night but seen as a “resting night” as you are expected to attend to his needs when necessary during the night. Some nights he is quite settled and others he is not. You will work in a lovely home where the night support worker has their own room, bathroom and use of a duty room. The parents are supportive and the staff enjoy the work and working with the client.

A DBS for childworkforce is a must and if you are not on the DBS Update Service we will arrange for you to apply again.

About you

You will have some experience of disturbed nights which could be with your own family. The family are willing to train the person with the right attitude, even if they do not have all the experience. Essentials are:

  • Confident in your own abilities to work with our client
  • Resilient to stay awake or have disturbed sleep
  • Sensitive to his needs, for instance not talking over him
  • Able to relate positively and enthusiastically to young people
  • Responsible to work on your own over a night shift, ensuring the safety, dignity, needs and wishes of the client and follow the care plan. The parents are on hand if needs be.
  • Computer literate to support our client and to communicate with the family and case manager.

Desirable:

  • Some experience with people with special needs in their home or working life
  • First Aid certificate
  • Previous training in medication provision, lifting and handling, safeguarding

Part-time hours: 22 per week

Salary: £224.00 per week

COVID-19 considerations:

  • Initial interviews will take place by telephone or video
  • Where face to face interview is required, you will follow the instructions at the home, including the use of masks, sanitisers, etc. as the family take account of the government guidelines.

To find out more and to apply for this position visit: https://uk.indeed.com/job/night-support-worker-f20b794516f7fb61

Closing date for applications: 19 September 2021

Job Support Worker

Housekeeper / Nanny

Full-time, Permanent

£32,000 a year

This Housekeeper Nanny job is ideal for you if you enjoy housework and working with children. The role is in Northwood, HA6 and the pay is above average.

The Role

To provide support for 2 daughters aged 11 and 13; and a son aged 14 in a caring and busy family home. This is an ideal role for someone who is organised and willing to be flexible and to support the family’s chosen lifestyle and interests that are varied. The children enjoy activities such as swimming and skiing and other outdoor activities. You must enjoy driving as the children need to be taken and collected from school and their activities. Housework is a large part of this role so you’ll not be afraid of the hard work that this entails.

To give you an idea of the job tasks we break it down as follows: 15% Nanny, 35% cleaner, 30% cook and 20% washing ironing.

This is a live-out position.

Working time:

  • Monday to Friday
  • School term: 07.00 to 19.00
  • Non-school term: 09.00 to 18.00

Pay

  • £32,000 per annum

Main duties and responsibilities

  • Wake and assist children to get ready for school
  • Drive the children to school and other social and leisure activities
  • Undertake appropriate creative, education and outdoor activities
  • Organise activities during non-school term
  • Help children with homework
  • Plan weekly meals with parents and prepare meals
  • Undertake daily and regular cleaning of the home
  • Laundry and ironing
  • Shopping and other duties as required.

Required

  • Full, clean drivers licence and a confident driver
  • Good level of written and spoken English
  • Organised to plan and prioritise work activities
  • Firm but tolerant and able to create a balance between work and play
  • Reliable, punctual, flexible to vary hours to accommodate family routines and energetic lifestyle
  • Non smoker
  • Enhanced DBS for child workforce

To find out more and to apply for this position visit: https://uk.indeed.com/job/nanny-housekeeper-f3a910c3b2e3f6b8

Closing date for applications: 28 August 2021

Embrace Antiracism

With awareness of racial issues more prominent than ever, now is a good time to ensure that you are fully conversant with the relevant rules, regulation and legislation, as it applies to the care sector as it does any other…

Recent government figures show that a large proportion of ethnic minority workers make up the healthcare sector [GOV.UK: Employment by sector 15/5/20] that includes public administration, education and health so it is vital that anyone managing staff in the care sector handles any matters surrounding racial equality in the correct manner.

Protection against discrimination due to someone’s race is provided by the Equality Act 2010. Race discrimination, which has been illegal in the UK since 1976, occurs when someone is unfairly disadvantaged for reasons related to their race – this includes for their colour, nationality and ethnic or national origins.

Factors at work that are protected by the Equality Act include:

  • recruitment and selection
  • promotion
  • training, pay and benefits
  • redundancy and dismissal
  • terms and conditions of work.

First let’s clarify the two types of discrimination: direct and indirect.

What is direct discrimination?

This is when a person is treated in a less favourable manner because of their race, when compared to others. For instance, if a care assistant or support worker of the same experience was paid less or expected to work less sociable hours, because of their race.

What is indirect discrimination?

This is when a particular provision or criteria puts a person of a certain race at a disadvantage, For example, if staff who don’t work on Saturdays are not eligible for promotion. If you have Jewish staff who observe the sabbath on Saturdays so are unable to work, that could be seen as indirect discrimination, as it disadvantages a racial group.

Changing attitudes within your organisation 

Organisations that promote an open culture of respect and dignity for their employees, and who are shown to value difference are more likely to have acceptable attitudes among their workforce.

It is important to show by actions that you will address any racism in the workplace – deal with any matters that come to your attention as soon as possible.

Create an anti-racism culture by:

  • Making it clear what your organisation’s values are, and also ensure it is clear that there is a zero-tolerance policy on racism
  • Tackle ways of working across your organisation, from people management to operational matters, to ensure systemic racism is stamped out
  • Ensure that any sustained action to challenge racism is shown to come from the managers and that it is clear that there is a commitment to change
  • Carry out a critical appraisal of your people management system
  • Ensure there are safe spaces to talk, to complain, to share experiences and so on
  • Be transparent in what you are doing and ensure that there is the opportunity for two-way communication.

Claims of racism in the workplace

As an employer, you are responsible for making sure that discrimination does not happen in your workplace. If a member of your staff is accused of racism, be aware that you can be responsible – it is called ‘vicarious liability’.

The law requires you to do everything reasonably possible to protect your staff from racial discrimination. If an employee feels that you have not looked after them under your ‘duty of care’ towards your staff, and that they cannot continue to work within your organisation, they could have a case for constructive dismissal.

You must investigate any claim of harassment or discrimination, otherwise you could find yourself subject to an employment tribunal. By taking the claim seriously you send out a clear message that racism will not be tolerated, that employees can expect to be helped if there is a problem and show that you make the workplace a fair place to be.

It is also prudent to note that employers are liable for acts of discrimination, harassment and victimisation carried out by their employees ‘in the course of employment’.

Best practice

It is also good practice to ensure that your staff are aware of any racial issues when it comes to caring for their clients and patients. ‘Race Equality in Health and Social Care’ from the Equality Commission of Northern Ireland is a useful document to review.

If you would like to discuss this subject further, please contact Cecily Lalloo at Embrace HR Limited.

T: 01296 761288 or contact us here.

If you would like to receive our newsletter, please sign up here.

Based in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, Embrace HR Limited provide a specialised HR service to the care sector, from recruitment through to exit.

Embrace Right to Work Checks

From 1 July, the rules surrounding the right to work checks for EEA (European Economic Area) nationals have changed. Make sure you are up to date…

Right to Work

Updated guidance has been released by the government when it comes to right to work checks. Within the care sector there is a high proportion of workers from outside the UK, so it is vital that the correct checks are carried out to ensure you, as the employer, are not liable for a civil penalty.

Please note, these checks must be carried out before day one of the employment start date.

Need-to-know

  • Employers can be subject to a civil penalty of up to £20,000 for each employee who does not have the right to work in the UK, if the correct checks were not carried out.
  • Note that companies need to have a sponsor license to hire most workers from outside the UK. Find out how to apply at www.gov.uk/uk-visa-sponsorship-employers.

What has Changed?

From 1 July 2021, EEA nationals (and workers from Switzerland) will have to demonstrate their right to work. This will be done using the Home Office online service – and it will be relevant to their immigration status, not their nationality. An online check is required for workers who only have digital proof of their immigration status in the UK. This applies to most EU (European Union), EEA, or Swiss citizens.

From this date an employer will no longer be able to take ID cards of EU, EEA, or Swiss citizens as proof of right to work.

Note that employers will not have to carry out retrospective checks on employees who are EEA nationals and who were employed on or before 30 June 2001. This applies as long as the initial right to work check was undertaken in line with right to work legislation and the Home Office guidance.

Case Study

We recently interviewed a Turkish national who works in the care industry. They had entered the UK six months ago on a self-employed visa.

So with these new laws in place, were we able to recruit them?

Turkey is neither an EU or EEA country. (The EEA includes EU countries plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. While Switzerland is neither an EU or an EEA member it is part of the single market. so Swiss nationals have the same rights to live and work in the UK as other EEA nationals.)

The ECAA 1, the self-employed Turkish Businessperson visa, allows Turkish citizens to form a new business or join an existing business. This visa requires the individual to show that they have the funds necessary to cover their living and business expenses, as well as any expenses of their dependents.

In essence, the requirements mean that the individual will not seek benefits to cover their expenses. The Turkish national we interviewed could have worked with our client as a self-employed person under HMRC rules, However, our client needed a full-time person who could cover various shifts, including nights. The Turkish national had other clients and would not have been able to commit and withdrew.

Find out more about the rules for recruiting workers from outside the UK at www.gov.uk/guidance/recruiting-people-from-outside-the-uk.

If you would like to discuss this subject further, please contact Cecily Lalloo at Embrace HR Limited.

T: 01296 761288 or contact us here.

If you would like to receive our newsletter, please sign up here.

Based in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, Embrace HR Limited provide a specialised HR service to the care sector, from recruitment through to exit.

Embrace Misty McCrory

We think it is high time you learn more about our fabulous team here at Embrace HR Limited. So we are kicking off our team spotlights by introducing our newest member, Misty McCrory, who joined us earlier this year….

Introducing Misty McCrory

Q: What is your role at Embrace HR Limited and what qualities will you bring to it?

A: I have joined Embrace as the Senior HR Adviser and I’m bringing with me 20+ years’ experience to the role – I really have dealt with all manner of HR queries! I am really friendly and approachable and have experience in all aspects of HR including managing disciplinary and grievance procedures, policy development and recruitment. I can provide advice and support to all management levels on all manner of employment law issues.

Q: When did you start at Embrace HR Limited?

A: I joined the company on 12 April 2021, initially for 2 days a week, but from the 4 May full time.

Q: Why should someone listen to your advice?

A: I am Chartered MCIPD and have spent the last 15 years working in Higher Education. Prior to that I worked for a Pub company as an HR administrator and learned a lot of the basics there. There is nothing I haven’t seen or heard!

Q: What does Chartered MCIPD mean?

A: Chartered MCIPD means that I am a Chartered Member of the CIPD – the Chartered Institute for Personnel and Development – a professional body for experts in people at work. As a Member, the CIPD recognises that I am an experienced people professional working operationally while thinking strategically; and I deliver people solutions that drive change within organisations and/or the profession.

Q: What do you like best about working within Human Resources?

A: Good question! For me it’s because I like dealing with lots of different people and being able to problem solve. I enjoy the variety of problems that can come about, no day is the same. I enjoy talking to people and helping where I can.

Q: What are you looking forward to most as a result of joining the Embrace HR team?

A: Given what I enjoy about HR, it’s the variety of clients and queries, feeling like I am making a difference and meeting lots of new people. Also working for a small team – the three other members of the team are so lovely and have made me feel very welcome and comfortable in a short space of time.

Q: What challenges do you envisage with your new role?

A: I’m looking forward to learning how the Care sector works, meeting lots of different clients and understanding their different ways of working. I’m used to working within a company where they must take my advice and don’t always want to, whereas being in a more consultative environment, my advice doesn’t have to be agreed with or followed through!

Q: Describe your typical day

A: Well it’s still early days here at Embrace, but presently I’ll check emails first thing, write a to-do list, (I love a good to-do list!) do the school run, catch up with the team and, if it all goes to plan, work through all that days’ tasks. In the afternoon, I’ll catch up with the team again, do the school run in reverse and try to finish off anything outstanding. Sometimes I have to scrap the to do list from the morning, as the day rarely goes how you plan it, especially if it’s taken up with numerous telephone calls and virtual meetings.

Q: And finally, what makes you happy?

A: That’s an easy one! My husband and two children. I have a 10-year-old daughter who loves dancing, in particular Irish dancing, pre-lockdown I would have been travelling around the country to Irish Feis dance competitions! My son is 14 and plays County level tennis, so we spend a lot of time taking him to tournaments. Both of them make me so proud as they are dedicated to their art sport and always work hard.

You can contact Misty, by email at: misty.mccrory@embracehr.co.uk, by telephone on 01296 761288 or contact us here.

Look out for future team spotlights on the other members of our team!

If you would like to receive our newsletter, please sign up here.

Based in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, Embrace HR Limited provide a specialised HR service to the care sector, from recruitment through to exit.

Job Support Worker

Support Worker in Chorleywood, Hertfordshire

Type:

Permanent Part-time: Waking Nights and late day/evening shifts

Location:

Chorleywood, Hertfordshire

Pay: £14.00 to £16.00 per hour (above average to reward flexibility)

Four week rolling shift pattern. Flexibility required to cover shifts when collegues are away.

  • Waking Nights – Saturday and/or  Sunday plus week day nights as required
  • Other shifts – late day time/evening
  • Shifts are usually worked with 2 members of staff

*Female Support Worker

  • Confident about working in client’s own home and sensitive to the needs and wishes of the parents
  • Assist with all aspects of care and personal hygiene including feeding, medication administration, changing pads
  • Patient and tolerant as attention is required throughout the night
  • Proactive with an encouraging approach especially during bedtime routine and settling and preparing for the morning
  • Responsible and able to work under own initiative and at times with a colleague especially when family may be away
  • Reliable, trustworthy and a good communicator
  • Capable of moving and handling and following therapists’ instructions
  • Cheerful, caring with a positive attitude
  • Hold a UK drivers licence (for day work)
  • Flexible – to cover other care staff shifts to ensure the smooth running of the care team

Experience:

Training will be provided for the person with the right attitude who fits in with the family. Experience is not necessary but is an advantage, whilst eagerness and willing to learn is preferable.

Most shifts are worked with a colleague.

Our client is an 18 year-old young woman with a physical disability and is fully dependent on using an electric wheelchair for all her daily mobility. She also suffers with Cognitive communication difficulties and is non-verbal but can make herself understood by making noises/pointing and has the use of some sign language. She is fully dependent on carers for all aspects of her day to day living which includes feeding, bathing, dressing etc… she can be very bubbly one minute with a wicked sense of humour but at times she can display extreme moods of behaviour.

* The employer claims exemption under the Equality Act 2010

To find out more and to apply for this position visit: https://uk.indeed.com/job/support-worker-ea34242f3bde2187

Closing date for applications: 6 June 2021

Job Support Worker

Support Worker – Permanent, part-time

Location:            Haywards Heath, West Sussex

Pay: 

  • £13-£15 per hour – Day Shifts
  • £14-16 per hour – Waking Night Shifts

Shifts available:   UPDATE – Waking Nights and 1 after school shift FILLED

  • Friday and Saturday: Waking Nights  21:00 to 09:00
  • After school: 2 shifts a week: 15:30 to 21:00 and 15:30 to 19:30 on Friday and school holiday shifts
  • Saturdays: Day shifts  depending on family activities

Are you a *Female Support Worker?

  • Confident about working in client’s own home and sensitive to the needs and wishes of the parents
  • Happy to learn new things, such as personal care routine (training will be given)
  • Patient and tolerant
  • Proactive with an encouraging approach
  • Responsible and able to work under own initiative
  • Cheerful, caring with a positive attitude
  • Reliable, trustworthy and a good communicator
  • Capable of moving and handling
  • Hold a UK drivers licence
  • Flexible – to cover other care staff shifts to ensure the smooth running of the care team

Experience:

Experience in caring for children/young people with disabilities is an advantage; administration of medication, follow through on therapy, keep accurate records. Enthusiasm, patience, and willingness to learn are key aspects of the role.

Our client:

We are currently looking for a Support Workers who can be flexible in the availability of shifts worked. Our client is a young girl in her teens who has complex physical and learning disabilities. She lives with her mother, father and 2 younger siblings. She is non-verbal with sensory impairments and complex physical needs so full support is needed to undertake all activities of daily living. She is fed via a gastrostomy and uses a combination of facial expressions, symbols and some eye pointing to communicate and is exploring eye gaze. She requires a high level of care both during the day and especially at night as our client frequently wakes and has an unpredictable sleep pattern. She uses CPAP to support her respiration at night and needs attention with regards to her gastrostomy and fluid intake. Our client enjoys the company of happy, lively people with outgoing personalities. She enjoys playing with her siblings, has a fantastic sense of humour and loves joining in all activities integral to family life. She enjoys being out in the community and therefore a full clean UK driving licence is essential.

To find out more and to apply for this position visit: http://uk.indeed.com/job/support-worker-b34f328a7b63ec9d

* The employer claims exemption under the Equality Act 2010

Satisfactory references and proof of eligibility to work in the UK will also be required.

This position requires a disclosure request from the DBS. A conviction will not necessarily prevent you from being employed.

Closing date for applications: 15 June 2021